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Graco 4Ever Extend2Fit All-in-One: Rear-Facing Space Comparison

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One of our most popular blogs is the Rear-Facing Space Comparison where we rate convertible seats based on the amount of room they take up in my vehicle compared with other seats in the group.

I was eager to add the new Graco 4Ever Extend2Fit to the comparison but I knew this was going to be more work than usual based on the many rear-facing installation options you have with this particular seat. This seat has 4 recline positions on the base that can be used to achieve an acceptable rear-facing recline position as per the angle indicator. The angle indicator is a liquid bubble level that has to be in the range of the blue line shown on the window. 4Ever Extend2Fit also has Graco’s unique 4-position legrest extension feature (truthfully there are 3 extension positions, the first position is fully retracted) AND the coveted 50 pound rear-facing weight limit.

 

I summarized my findings in the space comparison ratings but I wanted to supplement that information with the full scope of my conclusions here.

I started with the 4Ever Extend2Fit in base position #1 (most reclined), no legrest extension, head rest flush with shell. This is how the seat would be installed for a newborn or younger baby. I gained 3.5″ of room (based on the worst performing seat in the peer group). This measurement translates into a “B” rating in the comparison.

 

 

Base position #2 (more upright), no legrest extension, head rest flush with shell. This is how the seat might be installed for an older baby who has good head and neck control and can tolerate being seated in a more upright position. In this position I gained 4″ of room. This is a B+ rating in the comparison.

 

 

Base position #3 (very upright), no legrest extension, head rest fully extended. In this position the bubble level was outside of the acceptable range for rear-facing. This was NOT an acceptable installation as per the angle indicator so I’m not counting it. However, for those who are curious, it only gave me an extra half inch of room beyond what I got with the base in position #2. My measurement with the seat in this position was +4.5″ of space.

 

 

At this point, it seemed likely to me that you would only be able to use 2 of the 4 base positions in any particular vehicle to achieve an acceptable recline angle in the range allowed. But as I found out when I started to install using the legrest extension, the recline angle can change when you start to use this feature. More on that in a little while.

I went back to base position #2, extended the legrest 1 notch, head rest is still fully extended. Because I’m using the legrest extension now, I’m starting to lose space. Now I have +3.5″ (which is what I had with the seat fully reclined reclined in position #1 and no legrest extension). Again, this rates a “B” in the comparison.

 

Here we are in the same #2 base position, with the legrest fully extended and the head rest fully extended. As you can see, it’s taking up a LOT of space now. At this point I’m measuring a gain of only 1″ (based on the biggest space hogs in the peer group). In the comparison, this is a C- rating.

However, I was surprised to see the bubble level indicator in the middle of the blue line range now. When I installed using the same #2 base position without using the legrest extension, the bubble was much closer to the end of the allowable range. This made me wonder if I could get an acceptable installation using recline position #3 on the base with the legrest panel fully extended…

 

 

Final installation: Base position #3, legrest fully extended, head rest fully extended.  The liquid bubble is on the most upright end of acceptable range but it is within the range. I picked up a extra half inch of space with the base in position #3. The measurement is now +1.5″ which is a little better but still rates a C- in the comparison.

 

The other thing to keep your eye on when using the legrest extension feature is the amount of overhang allowed. When you start extending the legrest panel you increase the space between carseat and the vehicle seat and that positions the base closer to the edge of the vehicle seat cushion. Thankfully, Graco put a little blue sticker label on the edge of the base to show what the acceptable amount of overhang is. Overhang past that blue line is NOT acceptable. Too much overhang could be an issue in backseats with shallow cushions (e.g., Jeep Wranglers, some compact cars, extended cab pickup trucks, etc.). Luckily, you don’t have to use the legrest extension so you can just ignore that option if overhang becomes an issue.

 

Summary:

The Graco 4Ever Extend2Fit is a versatile 4-in-1 product with a 50 lbs. rear-facing weight limit and a very unique legrest extension feature. You may use base positions 1, 2, 3 or 4 to achieve an appropriate RF recline angle as per the angle indicator but don’t expect that all 4 positions will yield an appropriate recline position in your vehicle. You may use any of the legrest panel positions rear-facing without restriction. The only rules are: make sure your recline angle is in the allowable range and make sure you don’t have too much overhang of the base.

Having so many rear-facing installation options creates more potential for finding a suitable recline angle, giving your child some extra legroom and taking up less space in your vehicle. However, the reality is that once you start using the legrest extension feature, the seat definitely takes up more front-to-back space in the vehicle. I lost 2-3″ of space in my vehicle when I extended the legrest fully and that was using the more upright #2 & #3 recline positions. The seat would have taken up even more room if I had extended the legrest in the most reclined position.

Parents who are taller than average and/or driving vehicles with limited legroom in the backseat may find that they aren’t able to take advantage of the legrest extension feature without seriously compromising the space upfront for the driver or passenger. I found it interesting that in my vehicle the less expensive Graco Extend2Fit convertible actually takes up slightly less space without the legrest extension than the 4Ever Extend2Fit model. With the legrest fully extended, both seats had the same +1.5″ measurement.

Regular Extend2Fit convertible on left; 4Ever Extend2Fit on right

 

 

 

If front-to-back space is a big issue in your vehicle, and you don’t think that you will ever be able to take advantage of the legrest extension, then you might be better off with a different convertible seat since it doesn’t make sense to pay for a feature you won’t ever use. The original Graco 4Ever All-in-One, Graco Milestone All-in-One, Graco MySize 65 convertible & Graco Contender 65 convertible are all options that did better than average in our Rear-Facing Space Comparison but don’t have the Extend2Fit legrest feature.

Evenflo Spectrum 2-in-1 Booster *Giveaway* – USA & CANADA

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Happy Valentine’s Day!

How do we love thee? Let us count the ways…

We know we have the most awesome, most thoughtful, most caring readers and followers and we love you all for that! We also know that our most awesome, most thoughtful, most caring readers and followers love to win cool stuff so we thought this would be the best way to show you how much we love and appreciate you.

For this promotion we’ve partnered with our generous friends at Evenflo to give away not one, but two awesome new Spectrum Booster seats in the “Seascape” fashion – one for the U.S. and one just for Canada!

Spectrum Specs & Features:

  • Weight 40 – 110 lbs.
  • Height 44 – 57”
  • For kids at least 4 years old
  • Dual mode (highback & backless)
  • Adjustable headrest with 8 height settings (it’s taller than most other highback boosters)
  • Lyf+Guard side-impact protection technology in the head rest
  • Rollover tested
  • 6 year lifespan before expiration
  • Dual cupholders/snack trays
  • Machine washable cover that can also be thrown in the dryer
  • Made in USA

See our complete Evenflo Spectrum review here: https://carseatblog.com/41458/all-the-specs-a-review-of-the-evenflo-spectrum-2-in-1-booster/

This promotion is now closed. Congratulations to our winners, Amy H. & Jasmine D. 

How to Enter Evenflo Spectrum Booster Giveaway – USA

  • Leave us a comment below telling us what you love about the new Spectrum booster (comment required to be eligible to win), then click on Rafflecopter to qualify yourself.

a Rafflecopter giveaway
Now for the fine print – winner must have U.S. shipping address to claim the prize. Only one prize will be awarded in the Seascape fashion. Only one entry per household/family, please. If you leave more than one comment, only the first one will count. We reserve the right to deem any entry as ineligible for any reason, though this would normally only be done in the case of a violation of the spirit of the rules above. We also reserve the right to edit/update the rules for any reason. The contest will close on February 14, 2017, and one random winner will be chosen shortly thereafter. If a winner is deemed ineligible based on shipping restrictions or other issues or does not respond to accept the prize within 7 days, a new winner will be selected. Good luck!

How to Enter Evenflo Spectrum Booster Giveaway – CANADA

  • Leave us a comment below telling us what you love about the new Spectrum booster (comment required to be eligible to win), then click on Rafflecopter to qualify yourself.

a Rafflecopter giveaway
Now for the fine print – winner must have Canadian shipping address to claim the prize. Only one prize will be awarded in the Seascape fashion. Only one entry per household/family, please. If you leave more than one comment, only the first one will count. We reserve the right to deem any entry as ineligible for any reason, though this would normally only be done in the case of a violation of the spirit of the rules above. We also reserve the right to edit/update the rules for any reason. The contest will close on February 14, 2017, and one random winner will be chosen shortly thereafter. If a winner is deemed ineligible based on shipping restrictions or other issues or does not respond to accept the prize within 7 days, a new winner will be selected. Good luck!

Please note: If this is your first comment at CarseatBlog, or if you are using a different computer/device or a new email address, your comment may not appear immediately. It will not be lost; it may just take a few hours for it to be manually approved by one of us. Thank you for your understanding and patience as this is the only way we have to reduce comment spam.

The Carseat Lockoff Guide

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What is a lockoff and which carseats have them?

As LATCH weight limits shrink due to federal standards, more and more carseats require using the seatbelt to install once the child reaches a certain weight. In some cases the LATCH weight limit can be as low as 25 or 30 lbs. (child weight). The problem with seatbelt installations is that most parents have no idea how to lock the seatbelts in their vehicle in order to properly install a carseat or infant seat base. Ask the average parent or caregiver what a “switchable retractor” is or a “locking latchplate” and you’ll probably get a very confused look in response.

This is why every car seat in North America should come with a built-in lockoff! If you are installing with a seatbelt instead of lower LATCH anchors and your carseat has a lockoff device – use it and you will never have to worry about LATCH weight limits or understanding pre-crash locking features on vehicle restraint systems.

Function of built-in lockoff device: A lockoff device can serve more than one function but its main purpose is to cinch or clamp the seatbelt in such a way that it cannot loosen and your tight carseat installation stays tight!  

Current list of carseats that feature lockoff(s)

Chicco KeyFit 30 vs. Chicco Fit2 Carseat Comparison

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We’ve known and loved the Chicco KeyFit 30 carseat for years but now there is an exciting new Chicco rear-facing only seat on the market, the Fit2 Infant & Toddler Seat, and you might be wondering how they compare to each other. We were wondering the same thing so here you go…

KeyFit 30 (left) & Fit2 (right) in Stage 1 infant position

KeyFit 30 and Fit2 in Stage 2 toddler position (headrest not extended)

KeyFit 30 & Fit2 in Stage 2 toddler position (headrest fully extended to max height setting)

Specs & Features Comparison:

Specs & Features

Chicco KeyFit 30

Chicco Fit2

Weight limit

4-30 lbs.

4-35 lbs.

Height limit

30″ tall

35″ tall

Harness positions

3

7

Buckle positions

1

2

Lockoffs on base

Center LATCH strap with SuperCinch

Push-on LATCH connectors

Liquid bubble level

EPS foam

Newborn insert

Fits preemies

FAA approved for airplane use

Can be installed without base

Allows European beltpath routing

2-Stage base

  

Adjustable headrest

  

No-rethread harness

 

1-hand handle adjustment

 

Anti-rebound bar on base

  

Lifespan before expiration

6 years

  6 years

Country of Origin

China

Italy

Measurement Comparison: