Yesterday, in part I of this blog, we covered the 3 specific crash tests that are performed on European vehicles in their New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) - frontal offset, side impact, and side impact pole test.  Today, we’re going to dig a little deeper and examine the child occupant components of the Euro NCAP.  

Learning how other parts of the world are tackling the complex issues of child occupant protection can help give us some perspective on the shortcomings of our own NCAP program.  And, possibly, give us some ideas on how to move our program forward.  For more details on the US NCAP program check out our previous “Responding to the Tribune Article” blog.       

From the Euro NCAP website:

Euro NCAP has carried out a child occupant safety assessment since its very first test in 1997 to ensure that manufacturers take responsibility for the children traveling in their vehicles. In November 2003, Euro NCAP introduced a child occupant protection rating to provide clearer information for consumers about the results of these tests. As part of this assessment, Euro NCAP uses 18 month old and 3 year old sized dummies in the frontal and side impact tests. As well as studying the results from the impact tests, Euro NCAP verifies the clarity of instructions and seat installation in the vehicle to ensure that the child seat can be fitted safely and securely.