Chicco KidFit Booster Review – The Trifecta is Complete!

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Chicco KidFit-paprikaThe Chicco trifecta is now complete with the addition of the KidFit booster! We have always loved the KeyFit infant seat, we adore the NextFit convertible and now we have the KidFit booster to complete the series.

The Chicco KidFit Booster is a dual mode product which means that it can be used as a highback booster until the back portion is outgrown and then you can continue to use the bottom portion as a backless booster until your child can pass the 5-Step Test and safely transition to using the adult seatbelt. Currently the Chicco KidFit booster is available exclusively at Target.

KidFit Specs & Features

  • Highback: 30-100 lbs.; 38-57” tall; at least 4 years old and can sit relatively still and properly in a seatbelt at all times
  • Backless: 40-110 lbs. and all other requirements listed for highback mode
  • 10 height positions
  • Lower LATCH anchor attachments
  • 2-position backrest to match vehicle seat position/contour
  • Headrest fully lined with thick EPS foam
  • Dual cupholders made of flexible rubber material
  • Unique shoulder belt guide design
  • 8 year lifespan before expiration

Chicco KidFit Booster - lowest height Chicco KidFit Booster - tallest height Chicco KidFit Booster - side Chicco KidFit Booster - back Chicco KidFit Booster - naked Chicco KidFit Booster - thick EPS foam

Lower LATCH anchor connectors – premium push-on LATCH connectors attach quickly and easily and you tighten both sides of the strap simultaneously by pulling on the central adjuster strap at the front of the base. They refer to this feature as “SuperCinch” but it does NOT have the force-multiplying system found on the NextFit convertible. In this case “SuperCinch” is purely a marketing term being used to describe Chicco’s patented center-pull LATCH adjustment.

Using the lower LATCH connectors is optional. If you’re not LATCHing the KidFit, pull the strap to retract the connectors as much as possible so they don’t get in the way.

Chicco KidFit Booster - lower anchor connectors

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Star-Crossed Drivers

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zodiacScorpios are independent introverts. Pisces are creative daydreamers. Libras are horrible drivers.

Wait, what?

A Canadian insurance company wanted to see if there was any correlation between astrological signs and driving records. Although the study started off as a joke, apparently some trends became clear. Libras, Scorpios, and Capricorns get into more crashes than the other signs. Pisces, Aries, and Aquarians get the most tickets.

On the flip side, the safest signs for drivers are Gemini, Cancer, and Leo (fewest crashes), and Virgo, Sagittarius, and those already-safe Gemini (fewest tickets).

So should Geminis get a break on their auto insurance premiums? Should Libras pay more? Probably not. Again, the study was undertaken for fun, and it looks like the actual difference in statistics was fairly low. (15.8% of crashes attributed to Libras vs. 9% for Leo.)

Still, it can make for a fun discussion. I’m a Sagittarius, which ranked in the middle in terms of collisions and 11th (meaning second-best) in tickets. Is it just coincidence that I’ve only gotten one ticket in more than 20 years of driving? I’ll let you decide…

How do you rank?

Crashes (Worst to Best)

  1. Libra   (most crashes)
  2. Scorpio
  3. Capricorn
  4. Aries
  5. Aquarius
  6. Sagittarius
  7. Pisces
  8. Taurus
  9. Virgo
  10. Gemini
  11. Cancer
  12. Leo   (fewest crashes)

Tickets (Worst to Best)

  1. Pisces   (most tickets)
  2. Aries
  3. Aquarius
  4. Capricorn
  5. Libra
  6. Taurus
  7. Scorpio
  8. Leo
  9. Cancer
  10. Virgo
  11. Sagittarius
  12. Gemini   (fewest tickets)

Carseat Tom-foolery

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A couple blasts from the past, back in the old days when we were a bit less serious all the time!  Perhaps these are more suited to Throwback Thursday, but instead I re-visit them for some foolish fun this April 1st.  And for those who may take offense, we do not (usually) condone the use of duct tape for installation of carseats.  Normally, we prefer nails, screws and glue…

Carseat Install on a Moped:

Patented Super Secure Duct Tape Installation:

Update on Britax Marathon, Boulevard & Advocate ClickTight Convertible Harness Attachment Issues

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Britax ClickTight convertiblesBack in November, Consumer Reports published an article detailing safety concerns over the new Britax Boulevard ClickTight and Marathon ClickTight convertible seats. The Advocate ClickTight convertible model is also potentially affected.

We covered that story in depth here:

Consumer Reports on Potential Britax ClickTight Boulevard & Marathon Convertible Carseat Safety Issues

 

We want to emphasize that this only applies to the new “ClickTight” convertible models. All other Britax convertibles, such as the “G3″ or “G4″ models, are NOT affected. Frontier 90 ClickTight and Pinnacle 90 ClickTight Harness-2-Booster seats are also NOT affected. 

Today Consumer Reports shared an update on that issue:  http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2014/11/two-britax-car-seats-could-pose-safety-risk/index.htm?loginMethod=auto

3/31/15 update: Responding to a follow-up inquiry, Britax informed us that it they had shared test data and information with NHTSA and “confirmed the performance” of ClickTight seats. The company also shared that the problem we noted—that the restraint harness was not securely attached to the hooks on the lower harness anchors—was “an initial assembly issue” affecting all Marathon ClickTight, Boulevard ClickTight and Advocate ClickTight seats manufactured between August 15, 2014 and November 7, 2014.

Marathon CT DOM labelAction Required: Owners of all Britax ClickTight convertible carseats (Marathon CT, Boulevard CT & Advocate CT) manufactured between between August 15, 2014 and November 7, 2014 need to check their seats and make corrections, if necessary. The sticker label with the date of manufacture can be found by peeling back the cover on top of the CT compartment.

If the harness straps are properly secured to the anchors they should NOT be able to loosen or work themselves free all on their own. Please note that the straps come from the factory set in the smaller harness length setting for children under age 2. For kids over age 2 you must detach the hip straps from the anchors and re-attach them without looping them under the bar. Britax has instructions that clearly demonstrate the correct way to secure the hip straps onto the anchor in both the longer and shorter harness settings here: http://www.britaxusa.com/uploads/products/additional-resources/43.pdf

 

Britax CT Infographic - with DOM

 

FYI – owners of newer CT convertible models will notice that the metal anchors have been slightly bent in at the opening which makes it harder to get the straps on and off.

Britax CT hip anchor - bent

Please share this info with your friends and family so we get the word out to as many Britax CT convertible owners as possible. It only takes a minute to check the harness straps and fix them if they are loose or detached. In this case the only thing we need to keep children safe is information on what to look for and how to fix it!