Carseat Comparisons: Measurements and Features Data


Compare Child Restraint Safety Features and Carseat Dimensions

It’s been a very long time in the works, but we’re finally able to make public our database to compare carseat measurements and features, just in time to finish CPS Week, 2015.  The comparison tool uses measurements we take when we review products.  For products we haven’t measured ourselves, we use data contributed by Car-Seat.Org members.

Since measurements can vary from one person to another and even one day to the next, we caution that your own measurements may vary.  Plus, manufacturers update carseats from time to time, so there is absolutely no guarantee that these measurements are accurate or will reflect your own product.  This information is provided simply for rough comparisons among models.  To compare up to four carseats within a category, simply use the “Compare Carseats” pull-down menu option at the top of this page, click the links on the sidebar or click the “Go to” jump menu on mobile devices or click one of the category links below:

Compare Carseat Features ExampleCompare Rear-Facing Carseats

Compare Convertible Carseats

Compare Combination Carseats

Compare All-In-One Carseats

Compare High-Back Boosters

Compare Backless Boosters

Compare Carseats (Main Page)

More information, along with individual Carseat Data Capsules can still be found at Car-Seat.Org.

Among other measurements, we have compiled highest and lowest harness slot heights, crotch buckle depths, seating width and depth, and product weight as well as child age, weight and height ranges.  Where possible, we have also included valuable features like seatbelt lockoffs and product information such as lifespan.

CarseatBlog is not responsible for inaccurate information, omissions or other errors.  Some products have incomplete data and we apologize for any missing information.  We will slowly confirm or replace submitted information with our own measurements, but for many products we rely upon contributors to supply these measurements.  We would like to give a big Thank You to MomToEliEm and everyone from who contributed to this project over the years.    It originally was going to be hosted at the now defunct website, but technical hurdles made it too difficult.  The best intentions to create a new website just to host the comparison tool also ran into some challenges, but now it has found a home at CarseatBlog and better late than never!  We hope you find it useful when shopping for carseats or giving advice to friends and family.

This is still a work in progress.  We will be adding new products, filling in missing data and making other improvements regularly, so please check back again when comparing carseats.  We do welcome suggestions for products, comparison categories and general feedback about the appearance and usability of our data.  Please keep in mind that it is a commercial software product so we are limited in how it looks and feels.  Feel free to leave us a comment by replying to this blog!

All information is Copyright© 2001-2015, Carseat Media LLC, All Rights Reserved


To Everything, Turn, Turn, Turn


Oliver RF/FFSometimes it’s hard for Child Passenger Safety Technicians to take their own advice—-or at least it is for me.

If a dad came to me and asked if it’s okay to put his mature, normal-sized 6-year-old in a booster, I’d say sure. If a mom came to me and asked if her tall 10-year-old, who passed the 5-step-test, was really all right without a booster, I’d say it’s fine. If another mom asked about forward-facing a 4-year-old, I’d congratulate her on doing an awesome job and I’d tell her that I would do the same thing if it were my own child.

And yet when I’ve reached these same milestones with my own children, the choice hasn’t always been easy. In fact, I’ve struggled with all these scenarios in the past year. This spring, I hesitated to let my 5-stepping, nearly-5-foot-tall oldest child ride without a booster (though I did give in). A month later when my extremely-compliant 6-year-old started begging to ride in a booster, it took me weeks before I finally allowed her to use one in our secondary car.

Yet my reluctance in making those decisions comes nowhere near the internal struggle I’m facing as I decide what to do with my youngest child, Oliver, who’s about to turn 4. He still rides rear-facing in both of our vehicles and has never asked to go forward-facing. I don’t think he even realizes it’s an option.

I didn’t hesitate when it was time to turn my two older children forward-facing, but it’s different with this one.

See, not only is Oliver my baby, he’s my last baby. As my kids have all gotten older, I’ve been able to cling to “still” having him as my tiny little one: My other two outgrew the ring sling, but I still had Oliver to carry. The other two outgrew the octopus costume, but Oliver could still wear it. The other two didn’t want to read Moo, Baa, La La La anymore, but Oliver still loved it. My other two got too big to rock to sleep, but Oliver still fit in my arms.

The other two could forward-face, but Oliver still…

Well, he still fits rear-facing and will for a while, and yes, rear-facing is safer. But my resistance to turn him around isn’t about safety, it’s about me. I have absolutely no qualms about a 4-year-old forward-facing; I just have qualms about this particular 4-year-old forward-facing, because I’m afraid of letting go. The reality is that turning him around will mark the end of an era for me. Once he rides forward-facing I’ll never again have a rear-facing child. I’ll have to admit my baby is growing up, and I don’t know if I’m ready to do that.

Recaro Recalls Certain ProRide and Performance Ride Convertible Seats


Today Recaro Child Safety announced a recall of convertible seats made between April 9, 2010 and June 9, 2015.  Over 173,000 carseats are affected.  These child restraints do not fully comply with the system integrity requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 213. “When the affected child seats are installed using the top tether, the top portion of the restraint can crack and allow the top tether to separate from the restraint. As such, these seats fail to conform to the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 213, “Child Restraint Systems.” In the event of a crash, the child restraint could fail to protect the child from contacting interior surfaces of the vehicle, increasing the risk of injury.

Recaro submitted a petition for an exemption of non-compliance in July, 2014, and the NHTSA denied Recaro’s petition in July, 2015, after a public comment period in November, 2014.  “NHTSA’S Decision: In consideration of the foregoing, NHTSA has decided that the ProRIDE and Performance RIDE’s noncompliance poses a risk to safety and is therefore not inconsequential. Recaro has not met its burden of persuasion that the FMVSS No. 213 noncompliance identified in Recaro’s noncompliance information report is inconsequential to motor vehicle safety. Accordingly, Recaro’s petition is hereby denied and Recaro is obligated to provide notification of, and a remedy for, that noncompliance under 49 U.S.C. 30118 and 30120.”  The NHTSA also has recall related information.


Recaro ProRIDE convertible

Recaro ProRIDE convertible

Recaro Performance RIDE convertible

Recaro Performance RIDE convertible

What’s the Fix:

The remedy kit consists of a load limiting strap and instructions on how to install it on your carseat.

If you are a ProRIDE or Performance RIDE owner currently using a now-recalled seat, here’s our advice:

  • If you are using your ProRIDE or Performance RIDE convertible in the rear-facing position – you still need to contact Recaro for the recall fix, but the issue with the tether potentially separating from the shell doesn’t apply in your situation because that’s only a concern when the seat is installed forward-facing.
  • If you are using your ProRIDE or Performance RIDE convertible in the forward-facing position – consider whether or not your child could actually use this seat in the rear-facing position until you are able to obtain the recall fix kit. If your child weighs less than the rear-facing weight limit (which is either 35 or 40 lbs., depending on when your seat was made) and your child has a seated height (measure bottom of tush to top of head) of less than 22.5 inches tall – he or she can still use the seat rear-facing and you avoid the potential issue with the tether.
  • If you are using your ProRIDE or Performance RIDE convertible in the forward-facing position and using it rear-facing isn’t an option, please read Recaro’s statement below:

Recaro USA has issued the following statement:

What You Should Do:

During applicable tests conducted by NHTSA, the dynamic test scores that directly affect the child were still within the limits allowed by the FMVSS 213 standard, hence, you should continue to use your RECARO ProRIDE or Performance RIDE as instructed in your manual. You may check the model number and manufacture date on your child restraint to see if it is affected by this notice. You can find the model number and manufacture date on a white label on the left side of your child restraint. If your model is affected please email or call our customer service team at 1-866-628-4750 to obtain a repair kit. The repair kit will consist of a load limiting strap and instructions on how to install it in a vehicle.

Look for model numbers of 332.01.AK21, 332.01.KAEC, 332.01.KAEG, 332.01.KK91, 332.01.MC11, 332.01.MJ15, 332.01.QA56, 332.01.QA9N, 332.01.QQ11, 332.01.QQ14, 332.01.QQ95, 333.01.CHIL, 333.01.HABB, 333.01.HAZE, 333.01.JEBB, 333.01.JETT, 333.01.KNGT, 333.01.MABB, 333.01.MARI, 333.01.MNGT, 333.01.PLBB, 333.01.PLUM, 333.01.REBB, 333.01.REDD, 333.01.ROBB, 333.01.ROSE, 333.01.SABB, 333.01.SAPH, 333.01.SLBB, 333.01.SLTE, 333.01.VIBB, 333.01.VIBE and manufacturing dates between April 9, 2010 – June 9, 2015.

You can also order a fix kit directly by visiting Please be prepared to enter your model number and manufacture date of your child restraint.

Bumble Baby Booster: A Great Solution or a Dangerous One?


A few days ago we became aware of a new booster seat called the Bumble Baby by a company called SilverFlye. I’ll admit I was intrigued. It looks a lot like one of our Recommended Carseats, the BubbleBum, only wider. In fact, SilverFlye touts the Bumble Baby as an “ULTRA WIDE PORTABLE BOOSTER SEAT,” measuring “17 inches wide,” making it “the widest AND ONLY portable car booster seat on the market that your child won’t slip or slide off during sudden stops or sharp turns!”

I’ll also admit I was skeptical. We’d never heard of this company before, and some of the claims made us wonder if this was a cheap, illegal solution like some other seats that periodically pop up on Amazon.

Clearly our only choice was to order one and do a quick Bumble Baby booster review.

There are a few positive aspects to this seat:

  • It came in a nice, compact package.
  • It has a belt guide.
  • It really is quite wide.
  • The box claims that it “[m]eets all US Federal Motor Vehicle safety standards.”

Unfortunately there were a lot of negatives, too.

For one, this seat does not appear to be compliant with FMVSS 213, the regulations companies need to follow when certifying car seats. It’s possible the seat has passed safety testing—I have no idea—but FMVSS 213 covers more than just testing.

FMVSS 213 requires things like labeling. That might sound like a bureaucratic technicality, but it’s not. Among other things, labels on the seat need to include contact information for the manufacturer so parents can call if they have questions or problems. Belt-positioning boosters like this one are required to include instructions that they must be used with a lap and shoulder belt. Belt-positioning boosters are also required to have a label stating that they’re certified for use in motor vehicles but not on airplanes.

The Bumble Baby is missing all these and more.

Seats are also required to have registration cards attached to them so parents can send in their information (or register online) to be notified of potential recalls. The Bumble Baby did not include a recall card or any other information on how to register the seat. (The box did include a website, but when I went to it there was just a message that the store “will be opening soon.”)

These requirements are all clearly spelled out in the text of FMVSS 213. Anyone at the company who read over the regulation to make sure the seat “met all safety standards” certainly would have seen the dozens of pages of text about everything they needed to do. I can’t help but wonder what other details they might have missed.

There are other areas of concern.

Bumble Baby manualFor one, the instruction “manual” consists of an oversized postcard with 10 sentences of instruction, mostly about how to inflate the seat. There is no information about when the seat expires or if it needs to be replaced after a crash or…anything else, really.  Once you’ve thrown away the box, there is no information on the postcard or on the product with any contact information for the company, nor is any company information listed on their Amazon store page.

Of even greater concern is how flimsy the seat feels. When the BubbleBum first came out, people were understandably disturbed by the idea of an inflatable seat. Inflatable things deflate and pop, qualities that don’t inspire confidence in a car seat. But once people got their hands on a BubbleBum, they soon realized that it wasn’t a glorified beach ball: It’s a heavy-duty item that practically inflates itself and is very hard to deflate. I can’t say the same for the Bumble Baby.

Inflated, the Bumble Baby felt very squishy, not firm like the BubbleBum.


Bumble Baby squishBubbleBum squish

Bumble Baby squish 2 BubbleBum squish 2

(In those BubbleBum photos, you can see one of the large compliance labels the Bumble Baby lacks.)

Here’s a video showing how easily the Bumble Baby deflates:

I also looked at belt fit.