Monthly Archive:: November 2010

Babies R Us Sale


I’m loathe to post another Babies R Us sale, since the last one I advertised was cancelled for no apparent reason.  Still, they do carry some exclusive car seats like the Graco Nautilus Elite and Graco Snugride 30.  It’s also one place you can find the Harmony Secure Comfort Deluxe booster.  Anyway, stop by online for pre-Black Friday deals and a 10% off sale including free shipping with a minimum purchase:

Free Shipping on Everything with purchase of $100 or more (up to a $20 value, accessories, video game hardware & software are excluded) at Offer good 10.13.10 to 12.05.10

One Day Cyber Sale! Jumpstart your Holiday shopping! Save 10% off thousands of items on Online Only. Offer good 11.22.10.

One Day Cyber Sale! Save 10% on a great selection of car seats at Offer valid on 11.22.10 only.

We will try to post any other big sales or Black Friday promotions from our affiliate stores next week.  Also, stay tuned Monday for a photo review followup of the Britax Parkway SGL coverage that we did at the ABC Kids Expo a few weeks back!

Flying with a Car Seat? Know Your Rights!


When my son was 8 months old we flew from California to Chicago to visit relatives. Although I was not yet a Child Passenger Safety Technician, I understood the importance of using car seats, even on airplanes. So, as a diligent mother, I purchased him a ticket and installed his Britax Wizard rear-facing.

On three of our four flights, we had no problems. On the last one, though, the flight attendant insisted that I turn my son’s seat forward-facing because the passenger in front of him wouldn’t be able to recline. I knew the car seat should stay rear-facing, but with no proof and a plane full of anxious passengers, I acquiesced rather than put up a fight.

If only I had known about the Federal Aviation Administration’s Advisory Circular regarding Use of Child Restraint Systems on Aircraft, things might have been different.

The Advisory Circular, which was just updated a few weeks ago, details the FAA’s policies regarding child restraints on planes, and anyone traveling by aircraft with a child in a car seat would be wise to print out a copy and take it onboard. (Please note that the FAA regulations apply to U.S.-based carriers operating inside or outside of the United States. If you’re flying a foreign airline these guidelines won’t necessarily apply.)

To make things easy for you, the traveling parent, I am going to tell you exactly where to find the pertinent information so you can print out the Circular (like above) and highlight what you might need.

2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite: The Ultimate Kids & Carseats Review! (with tons of pics & videos)


Thinking about a New 2011 Ford Explorer with Inflatable Seatbelts?


You may want to rethink that option package and buy the regular old-fashioned seatbelts.  While a great idea in theory with adults and with older kids in backless boosters, if you’re still installing carseats, these belts can cause problems for you depending on your carseat manufacturer.  Now sure, this technology is old news by now since Darren talked about it a year ago.  But carseat manufacturers are just now putting the warnings in their manuals about installing their carseats using these inflatable belts.  Britax is the first to put the warnings in their manuals and Combi is set to follow.  Ford has stated that they have tested carseats with the “airbag” seatbelts and the carseats have performed as expected. 

What do you do?  You follow the carseat manufacturer’s guidelines since they have the best knowledge of how their carseat will perform.  If the manufacturer says no inflatable seatbelts, try using LATCH instead to install the carseat or use a carseat from a different manufacturer that doesn’t have the inflatable seatbelt warning.  If you’re buying a 2011 Ford Explorer, check the options list on the window sticker carefully to see if the inflatable seatbelts are included.  Some dealers are automatically choosing this option when ordering the vehicles from Ford, so you may not have a choice if you’re choosing from a vehicle on the lot.  Inflatable seatbelts are also on some commercial airplanes in the bulkhead seats and on many private planes.  They are thicker than regular airplane seatbelts, so they should be easy to detect.  And there is another 2011 car with the inflatable belts: the Lexus LFA.  But I dare you to install a carseat in that car ;).