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Monthly Archive:: May 2010

Combi Shuttle 33 Infant Carseat Unboxing & Preview

The Combi Shuttle 33 is the newest version of the original Combi Shuttle model.  This new model has increased weight and height limits and is compatible with almost all  2009 & 2010 Combi 3-Second Fold Strollers (CosmoFlare, Flash EX, Saavy & Twin Sport which can accept ONE Shuttle 33). The exception is the Coccoro Flash stroller frame which can only accept the Combi Coccoro convertible seat. 

The Shuttle 33 has no listed minimum weight or height limit  - the labels and instruction manual state that this seat is for children who weight 33 lbs or less, whose height is 33″ or less and the top of the head is at least 1″ below top of headrest.  It also has an anti-rebound bar built into the carrier which is a nice, premium feature not found on many other infant carseat models.  One particular quirk of this seat is that the base MUST be used if the child weighs more than 22 lbs.  For children under 22 lbs, you have the option of installing the carrier without the base.   

Stay tuned – a full review will be coming sometime in the next few weeks!  Right now it’s the “busy season” around here with sports activities for both boys, teaching CPS Technician Certification Courses and lots of check events keeping me really, really busy.  I apologize for the unboxing video being in 2 parts but my memory stick ran out before I could finish!  LOL!

The Complete Shuttle 33 Review is now posted HERE!

onBoard, onBoard 35, onBoard 35 Air – Confused about the differences? You should be!

No, it’s not you.  It’s them.  Really.  It’s almost as bad as their 6 names and counting for the Alpha Omega Elite but it’s still relatively early in the onBoard game so who knows how many more versions of this seat they can come up with.  Anyway, in an effort to cut down on some of the inevitable confusion – we here at CarseatBlog have attempted to give you the low-down on each of the different onBoard infant carseat models.  If you find an error or omission – please let us know. This was a more confusing task than even I expected.

Similarities:  Each model/version has the same dimensions.  They all have the same 4 sets of harness slots and 3 positions for the crotch strap.  The handle can be in any locked position while in the vehicle.   They all have a front harness adjuster and a splitter plate which makes moving the harness straps to different heights quick and easy.

1.  Original onBoard model:

  • Model # 22077
  • 4-22 lbs,  29″ or less
  • Preemie infant insert supports
  • Base has built-in lockoffs
  • Adjustable base has 3 positions
  • Lower LATCH attachments are the standard hook-syle connectors
  • Single range bubble level recline indicator
  • EPP foam
  • Also sold as the Eddie Bauer “SureFit” infant carseat which was part of the “Endeavor” Travel System (carseat and stroller combination)
  • Discontinued in favor of newer onBoard models with expanded weight limits  (I think)

 

2.  onBoard 35 Air

  • Model # 22395
  • MSRP $179 – $189
  • 4-35 lbs, 32″ or less
  • “Air Protect” Technology for enhanced side impact protection
  • Preemie insert support cushions
  • Base has built-in lockoffs
  • Base is adjustable and has 3 positions
  • Lower LATCH attachments are the premium “push-on” style connectors
  • Dual recline angle indicators (4-11 lbs, 11-35 lbs)
  • Complete onBoard 35 Air review HERE

 

3.  onBoard 35 Air SE (Special Edition)

  • Model # 22395
  • MSRP $199 -$209
  • Same features as 35 Air (above) but with premium fabrics and embroidery

 

4. onBoard 35 (complete 4- 35 version just without Air Protect Technology)

  • MSRP $129-$159
  • Model # IC009
  • 4-35 lbs, 32″ or less
  • Preemie inserts
  • Premium base with lock-offs and recline adjustment lever
  • Standard hook-style lower anchor connectors
  • EPP foam
  • Dual recline angle indicators (4-11, 11-35)

 

5.  onBoard 35 (stripped-down version)

  • MSRP $99
  • Model #22375
  • Rated from FIVE - 35 lbs, 32″ or less
  • No preemie insert (only standard head-hugger insert included)
  • Dual recline angle indicator (5-11 lbs, 11-35 lbs)
  • Base has no lockoffs
  • Base has no lever to engage recline foot (see link below for instructions on how to recline the base)
  • Base has only 2 positions – fully reclined or no recline at all (the difference is about 3″)
  • Standard hook-style lower LATCH connectors
  • EPP foam

OnBoard #22375 base adjustment

And the Winner of the Cybex Solution X-Fix Is . . .

BookMama!  Thanks so much to everyone for participating in our Cybex Solution X-Fix giveaway :).  BookMama, check your email.






Too old for a booster? Says who?

This isn’t a full review, but I wanted to share our experience with the original Britax Frontier model in booster mode.  In short, we love it :).  This is Karsten last summer, he was almost 12, about 90 pounds, and about 60 inches tall.  That’s the top listed height limit for the original Frontier model.  He’s a fairly average sized tween, and actually had  just started to fit safely in the adult seatbelt in the captain’s chairs (Passing the 5-step test: Bum all the way back in the seat, knees bent comfortably at the edge of the seat,  lapbelt low on the hips, shoulderbelt in the middle of the shoulder, and sitting that way the entire time.  I also add my own requirement, that kids’  feet be flat on the floor, so that way they don’t feel the need to scootch forward and rest their feet, causing the belt to fit higher on the abdomen.  Maybe some kids can sit perfectly the entire ride with their feet dangling, but not mine!).

Both the original Frontier and the new Frontier 85 model can be fully LATCHed into place in booster mode (Lower anchors plus top tether is allowed, though not required) to hold it in place when it’s not occupied.  It it has ample depth for leg support, is wide and tall for kids with wider shoulders, and this model has flip out cupholders (the new Frontier 85 has integrated cupholders).  But the number one reason he loves sitting in it is that it has head support.  If you’ve ever wished for a way to comfortably relax in the car and lean your tired head to the side for a snooze, you know exactly what I mean.   Maybe one day, cars will have adjustable-wing headrests, like some airplane seats have had for years now.  Until then, I’m glad Britax offers such a tall booster with so much comfort for very tall kids.

Oh, and yes, he has a black belt in Tae Kwon Do.  If anyone really wants to rough him up for sitting in a baby seat, they’d better watch out ;)

Infant Seat Handle Positions

A common question parents often have when using infant seats is “where should the handle go—up or down?”  It’s not that simple anymore, actually.  On some seats, the handle must be up.  On some, the handle must be down.  On one, the handle is recommended to be placed all the way forward, toward the baby’s feet!  And I guarantee you that in every vehicle but one I’ve seen with an Evenflo infant seat, the handle has been in the incorrect up position.  So, instead of playing “Guess the Handle Position” with your infant seat handles, let’s get some help.

We’re big supporters of SafetyBeltSafe USA here at the blog.  They work tirelessly in pursuit of child passenger safety and have for years, trying to push legislation and forward thinking.  SBS USA is the nonprofit organization that produces the manufacturers’ instructions CD that every technician should have and the color pictorial that helps us identify those pesky CL carseats that leave us scratching our heads.  SBS USA has gone and done it again: they’ve created a document listing all infant seats and their handle positions.  After you’ve checked out the handle positions document, take a look at all the other documents they have for free on their website: www.carseat.org/Resources/Repro_Mat_Lst.htm .  And I know that this blog post didn’t start out this way, but if you have a couple bucks left over in your PayPal account, you might want to thank SBS USA for their generous help and dedication to all of us.