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Monthly Archive:: August 2009

Safety 1st Complete Air Review Followup Comments

I was going to write a full review, one of my typical epic blogs that you can’t possibly read without falling asleep.  Unfortunately, I fell asleep every time I thought about writing it.  So, I’m going to just add enough followup comments to make you drowsy and then turn it over to another reviewer for more input.  You can find my first look in an earlier blog.

Safety 1st Complete Air

Some thoughts-

My wife likes it.  We used it extensively over the last few weeks, including a family driving vacation.  She is not a carseat advocate, so this is a good endorsement.  You can find the Safety 1st Complete Air and the newer Complete Air LX at Amazon and many other stores.

What should a parent/caregiver expect from a CPS Tech?

The following information was taken from the monthly CPS Express newsletter for certified CPS Techs (August 2009): 

What should you, as a parent or caregiver, expect from a Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST)?

The one-on-one education of a safety check usually takes 20-30 minutes, depending on the car seat and the vehicle. The CPST should take all the time necessary to ensure that you feel competent and confident in re-securing the car seat into the vehicle and re-buckling your child into its car seat on your own.

 Card your tech! Ask to see proof of his or her current certification.

 During the check up, a competent CPST will:

• Fill out a checklist form (including car seat type, location in vehicle, misuse observations, if any, etc.).

• Review car seat selection appropriate for your child’s age, size, and review factors affecting proper use.

• Review the restraint manufacturer’s instructions and the vehicle owner’s manual with the caregiver and ensure that both are being followed correctly.

• Ensure that an appropriate seating position in the vehicle is being used, especially when using LATCH.

• Check the car seat for recalls, visible damage and an expiration date. If the seat is unsafe, you should replace the seat since it may not work as it should in a crash.

• Show what is correct or will be corrected before making the adjustment.

• Have you install the car seat(s) correctly using either the seat belt or LATCH system. Feel free to ask to learn how to install the seat with either options or in different seating positions.

• Discuss the next steps for each child, such as when to move to the next type of restraint.

• Discuss the benefits for everyone, including all adults, to riding properly restrained.

• Discuss safety in and around the vehicle (never leaving kids unattended, walking around the vehicle before moving, etc.)

• Discuss your state laws and best practice recommendations for occupant safety.

 

This tool is brought to you by the Child Restraint Manufacturer’s Consortium.

Consortium Members: Britax, Chicco, Clek, Combi, Compass-Learning Curve, Dorel, Evenflo, Graco, Mia Moda, Orbit, Peg Perego, Recaro, Safe Kids Worldwide, Safe Traffic Systems and Sunshine Kids.

Fun at Traffic Court!

Traffic CourtWhat a great day I had today! I got to drive an hour north to the City of Kingston to sit for 1.5 hours on a hard wooden bench in Traffic Court! Woo hoo! That was almost as much fun as getting pulled over by an incredibly pleasant and warm-hearted (not!) state trooper at 7 AM on my way to teach the last CPS certification class. Apparently I was driving 72 on this stretch of highway and didn’t realize it was a 55 mph zone. My bad.  

To be honest, I was really annoyed when the trooper wrote me but he was annoyed with me too for not pulling over immediately (silly me was actually looking for a safe place to pull over instead of the non-existent shoulder of the highway). I tried, very politely, to explain this to him when he got all huffy with me but he didn’t seem to appreciate my concern for both his safety and mine. Whatever.  

The good news is that the prosecutor let me plead to a non-moving violation. I think I pled to parking on the curb or something along those lines. The bad news is that it still cost $100. Thank goodness my DH never reads this blog.  ;)

The Waiting is the Hardest Part

PriusI’ve ranted before about government bailouts.  A trillion here, a trillion there, pretty soon it adds up to real money.  Yet, somehow, not a dime seems to appear to help prevent the #1 killer of kids.  Recently, we’re pumping billions into helping people trade in their clunkers in order to take on even more debt so that they can buy a new car.  I’m glad it’s at least giving lip service to promoting better fuel economy.  I’d like to see some attention to better safety, too.

For example, I’d like to see new model year vehicles crash tested quicker.  Sometimes, it seems like it’s half way through the model year before results are available.  By then, half the sales are completed.  There are certainly very legitimate reasons why the NHTSA and IIHS ratings can’t be ready the moment a popular new model hits the market.  I’m also sure it’s nothing a billion or two dollars and some love from congress couldn’t fix!

Yeah, I’m a bit of a safety nut.  In our discussions about having a third child, I put in my request for a new minivan.  The old one had good crash test ratings, but the new one had side curtain airbags and stability control, plus top ratings all around.  My wife’s Subaru also lacked the latest features, much to my chagrin.  I’ve been hinting that she needed something safer and more fuel efficient for a year or two.