Recalls Archive

Carseat Recalls – the good, the bad and the ridiculous

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Recall-stampYour carseat is recalled. Those words strike fear into the hearts and minds of safety-conscious parents everywhere. After all, no one wants to hear that there is a potential problem with their carseat – a product that they’ve entrusted to protect their child’s life under the worst possible circumstances. For child restraint manufacturers, recalls are more than just fixing compliance or safety issues – they tend to be costly and chock full of bad publicity. In short, recalls are bad for business. However, voluntary recalls are also a part of the business and almost every manufacturer has to face a recall issue sooner or later. It’s important to understand that not all recalls are for serious safety-related problems although some clearly are.

A carseat could be recalled for having a small hole in the shell (for attaching the cup holder) if enough kids get a finger stuck in that hole. A seat could also be recalled for having an incorrect phone number for NHTSA listed on the label. Or for having a mix-up with the English/Spanish sticker labels. Labeling errors are actually pretty common but rarely are they a safety concern.

Most consumers have no idea how many nit-picky little criteria are in FMVSS 213 that must be complied with. One perfect example, if the carseat is one that is certified for use in motor vehicles and aircraft then the label is required to state that. But it’s also required to state that in red lettering. If someone, somewhere, screws up and that wording winds up printed on the label in black or gray, or any color other than red, then… you guessed it – the seat will be recalled for failing to comply with federal standards.

Britax Frontier 80 FAA Certification Label

Meanwhile, every store around the country that carried that particular carseat will probably have that “WANTED – DEAD OR ALIVE” recall notice poster with a picture of the culprit hanging in the aisle or posted on a bulletin board – alerting consumers to the failure of that product to comply with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. I bet the money spent on that recall campaign could buy a whole lot of red ink. And probably a few years worth of gas and groceries too.

It’s ridiculous that all recalls get lumped together and there is no differentiating between a misdemeanor and a felony. How many parents get totally freaked out because of some minor issue that has nothing to do with the safety of their child restraint? On the flip side, there are plenty of legitimately scary recalls that can affect the product’s ability to protect children in crashes. Almost every manufacturer has to deal with something that falls into this category sooner or later. No product or production process, no matter how good, is guaranteed to be flawless 100% of the time.

What REALLY matters in these situations is how the manufacturer responds once it becomes apparent that there is a problem (or at least the potential for a problem). Do they quickly identify a solution and issue a voluntary recall right away – before any children are seriously injured? Or do they drag their feet, arguing back and forth with NHTSA for years until they are forced to issue a recall?

I have to say that there have been a lot of properly handled recalls recently that reaffirm my faith in some carseat manufacturers. Timely and appropriate responses combined with good customer service really go a long way to calm fears. Obviously, the more severe the problem or defect, the more it will take to regain the trust of consumers but good customer service is always the best place to start whenever there’s a problem. Well, that and an acceptable solution to whatever the problem is. I’ve seen some really lame “solutions” to recall issues over the years but that’s a topic for a whole different blog.

So, what can consumers do to protect their children from faulty products? Spending a lot of money on a CR doesn’t make it less likely to be recalled. Really, your best protection is to be an educated consumer. Whenever possible, buy products from manufacturers who have a good reputation for recalling seats quickly when problems arise and for handling problems with excellent customer service. It is also critical that you register your child restraint with the manufacturer so that you will be notified in the case of a recall.  If you move – don’t forget to call them and update your contact info!

If you’d like to check your carseat or booster for recalls – there are several resources available. Keep in mind that recalls may occur years after the product has been purchased. Here are links to the 2 most popular recall lists:

NHTSA Recall List:  http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/recalls/childseat.cfm

University of North Carolina HSRC Recall List: http://www.buckleupnc.org/car-seat-recall-list/

You can also sign up for email alerts whenever a new recall is announced:  http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/subscriptions/index.cfm

2016 Graco Extend2Fit Recall

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Graco Extend2Fit - stockThe Graco Extend2Fit just hit the shelves, but there’s already a recall on some seats. Not to worry, though: The recall is very minor and does not affect the safety of the seat.

The issue is that seats sold in the U.S. need to have labels in both English and Spanish. On some Extend2Fits, the wording on some of the recline labels (identifying positions 1-6) got mixed up, so there’s English on the Spanish side or vice-versa.

If you have an Extend2Fit, check to see if the labels are entirely in English on one side of the seat and entirely in Spanish on the other. If the languages are mixed together, you can call Graco for replacement labels. The seat is perfectly safe to use in the meantime.

Wording of the recall from the Graco website:

Potential Problem:

Over the past 60 years, safety has been and will continue to be our priority at Graco. As part of our continuous effort to provide quality and safe products, Graco has discovered that the recline label on a small portion of the Extend2Fit convertible car seats manufactured between November 27, 2015 to January 20, 2016 does not meet regulatory guidelines. While the affected products represent less than one percent of those produced, Graco is recalling the recline label on the affected car seats and providing owners with a free replacement label that can be applied directly to the car seat. The affected Extend2Fit convertible car seats are part of the Campaign fashion sold in the United States.

Injuries Reported: 0

Number of Units Affected: 15,064

Dates Produced: Manufactured between November 27, 2015 – January 20, 2016

MSRP: $199.99

Models Affected: 1954477

Solution:

To verify if a car seat is included in this recall, caregivers should check their model number and date of manufacture. In addition, caregivers should confirm whether their recline label is correct by examining all labels on the side of the car seat (including the recline label which identifies positions 1 through 6) to determine they are in the same language (i.e. all English (including the recline label) on one side of the car seat and all Spanish on the other side of the car seat). If the languages are the same, caregivers can continue to use their car seat without hesitation as instructed in the owner’s manual; the car seat does not need a new label as provided by the recall. If the recline label is incorrect because the languages on the side of the car seat do not match, then caregivers can contact the Graco consumer services team at 1-800-345-4109 (Monday through Friday from 9 am to 5 pm ET) to order a free replacement recline label.

Click here to see if you are affected, or contact Graco toll-free at 800-345-4109 Monday – Friday from 8 am to 5 pm EST. The model number and date of manufacture can be found on the white label located on the bottom of the car seat.

Britax B-Ready Stroller Arm Bar Recall

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Britax USA/Canada B-Ready Arm bar Recall

Britax Child Safety, Inc., in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and Health Canada, is conducting a voluntary recall of select B-Ready stroller and replacement top seat models. This recall involves the foam-padded arm bar on select BReady strollers and replacement top seats manufactured between April 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012. The model numbers included in this recall are identified in the table below.

 

B-Ready Recall

NOTE: No other products are included in this recall. If your Britax product has a different model number than the model numbers listed above or it was made after December 31, 2012 it is NOT included in this recall.

Description of the Defect: Britax has received reports of children biting and ingesting pieces of the non-toxic foam on the arm bar on select B-Ready strollers and replacement top seats manufactured between April 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012. This may pose a choking hazard.

Remedy of the Defect:  Upon request, Britax will send one free black, zippered fabric arm bar cover and a warning label to consumers to apply to their strollers or replacement top seats.

What You Should Do: Determine whether your B-Ready stroller or replacement top seat is included in the recall by inspecting the arm bar on your product. Your product is part of this recall if the foam-padded arm bar on your B-Ready stroller or replacement top seat is exposed and does not have a black, zippered fabric cover. (See images below)

B-Ready Recall 2

If you own recalled product, please follow the steps below:

  1. Visit www.B-ReadyRecall.com to request a kit containing a zippered fabric arm bar cover and warning label.
  2. Remove and discontinue use of the foam-padded arm bar until you receive and apply the zippered fabric cover and warning label. Using the stroller or replacement top seat without the arm bar is safe and permitted. The arm bar is used for child passengers to rest their hands and is not critical for safe use of the stroller or replacement top seat.
  3. Once you receive the kit, please follow the detailed instructions on how to apply the zippered fabric cover and warning label.

If you have questions or concerns, you should contact the Britax Customer Service Department at the dedicated recall line: 1-800-6832045. Customer Service business hours are Monday-Thursday 8:30 am – 5:45 pm (ET) and Friday 8:30 am – 4:45 pm (ET). If you live outside of the US or Canada, you should e-mail Britax.Recall@britax.com.
Britax is committed to the safety of your child and we apologize for any inconvenience this matter may have caused.

2016 ComfortSport/Ready Ride/Classic Ride Recall

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2016 Graco ComfortSport, Ready Ride, Classic Ride Recall

Graco is recalling some of their ComfortSport, Ready Ride, and Classic Ride convertible carseats due to missing information on a label. This DOES NOT affect the safety of the carseats, but the information is required by NHTSA.

ComfortSportReady Ride JeenaClassic Ride

Seats Affected: ComfortSport, Ready Ride, and Classic Ride convertibles manufactured between March 2014 and February 2015

2016 Graco ComfortSport, Classic Ride Recall

Defect: Missing verbiage on label

2016 Graco convertible recall

Remedy: Graco will send new labels to caregivers. Go to the 2016 Label Recall page to see if your carseat has been recalled. Some carseats within the recall timeframe have corrected labels. You can also call Graco at 1-800-345-4109 (Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST).