Safety Archive

2016 Graco Extend2Fit Recall

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusmail

Graco Extend2Fit - stockThe Graco Extend2Fit just hit the shelves, but there’s already a recall on some seats. Not to worry, though: The recall is very minor and does not affect the safety of the seat.

The issue is that seats sold in the U.S. need to have labels in both English and Spanish. On some Extend2Fits, the wording on some of the recline labels (identifying positions 1-6) got mixed up, so there’s English on the Spanish side or vice-versa.

If you have an Extend2Fit, check to see if the labels are entirely in English on one side of the seat and entirely in Spanish on the other. If the languages are mixed together, you can call Graco for replacement labels. The seat is perfectly safe to use in the meantime.

Wording of the recall from the Graco website:

Potential Problem:

Over the past 60 years, safety has been and will continue to be our priority at Graco. As part of our continuous effort to provide quality and safe products, Graco has discovered that the recline label on a small portion of the Extend2Fit convertible car seats manufactured between November 27, 2015 to January 20, 2016 does not meet regulatory guidelines. While the affected products represent less than one percent of those produced, Graco is recalling the recline label on the affected car seats and providing owners with a free replacement label that can be applied directly to the car seat. The affected Extend2Fit convertible car seats are part of the Campaign fashion sold in the United States.

Injuries Reported: 0

Number of Units Affected: 15,064

Dates Produced: Manufactured between November 27, 2015 – January 20, 2016

MSRP: $199.99

Models Affected: 1954477

Solution:

To verify if a car seat is included in this recall, caregivers should check their model number and date of manufacture. In addition, caregivers should confirm whether their recline label is correct by examining all labels on the side of the car seat (including the recline label which identifies positions 1 through 6) to determine they are in the same language (i.e. all English (including the recline label) on one side of the car seat and all Spanish on the other side of the car seat). If the languages are the same, caregivers can continue to use their car seat without hesitation as instructed in the owner’s manual; the car seat does not need a new label as provided by the recall. If the recline label is incorrect because the languages on the side of the car seat do not match, then caregivers can contact the Graco consumer services team at 1-800-345-4109 (Monday through Friday from 9 am to 5 pm ET) to order a free replacement recline label.

Click here to see if you are affected, or contact Graco toll-free at 800-345-4109 Monday – Friday from 8 am to 5 pm EST. The model number and date of manufacture can be found on the white label located on the bottom of the car seat.

Driver’s Edge: The One Driver’s Ed Class Your Teen Should Take

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusmail

Drivers Edge signEvery time I look in the mirror, I’m reminded that I am indeed old enough to have a kid who is driving age. I still feel young and spritely—as long as I get my nap every afternoon after lunch—and it gives me the energy I need to ride shotgun as my son gets behind the wheel every day after school for the long drive home.

Our state did away with driver’s ed in high school long ago—theoretically to save money (note how well our drivers are doing: we’ve set a new record last year for pedestrian deaths, vehicle crashes and resulting deaths are at a crazy high, red light runners rule the intersections, and if you stop at a red light or stop sign before turning right, you are very likely to get hit or honked at). Instead of learning on simulators in classrooms and learning common sense rules and the laws of the road, new drivers literally get tossed behind the wheel of a multi-ton steel box and you’d better hope, folks, that the person teaching them is a decent driver.DrivingSimulator

In-sanity. There are driving schools, of course, and a student driver must either attend a school or take an online class provided through the DMV, plus log 50 hours behind the wheel. Many choose to take the online class because it’s easy. That’s one reason why we have so many red light runners, non-existent turn signal users, and drivers who can’t think past the hood of their vehicle. Enter Driver’s Edge.

Driver’s Edge is a non-profit 4-hour program that gives drivers ages 21 and younger hands-on experience in panic driving situations. I first heard about this program at a Lifesavers Conference many years ago when I saw their booth. I knew when my kids started driving, I’d have them go through the program. Here we are.

Before we even went outside, Jeff Payne, the founder and CEO of Driver’s Edge, talked to us about statistics and the importance of driver’s training. We’re in the safety business around here and we know kids don’t graduate to safe status once they are out of boosters. On the contrary, that’s usually when they are at their most vulnerable: they start making their own decisions about safety and due to brain and emotional immaturity, those decisions sometimes aren’t the best. Jeff outlined some examples:

  • Inexperience: teen drivers simply don’t have the driving experience adults have
  • Drinking and driving: still a leading cause of crashes and kids are still riding with drivers who have had alcohol
  • Texting and driving: less of a problem than it’s been in the past, but it’s still there
  • Seat belts: not buckling up

Driving simulators and political correctness don’t exist at Driver’s Edge. These guys realize that lives are on the line and they cut past the BS; I appreciated the bluntness. Classes are conducted in real vehicles by real race car drivers and there’s an indoor session with local highway patrol and police. Car crashes are the number 1 killer of people under age 21 and DE wants to combat that by teaching life-saving skills. When in the vehicles, young drivers practice evasive lane change maneuvers, ABS and non-ABS braking exercises, panic braking, and skid control. Some parents are still teaching their kids old school techniques of pumping the brakes to stop, so these classes combat that bad advice and while the kids wait for their turn, they also learn what to do if they’re pulled over by the police, basic car care, how to optimally adjust their seats and mirrors, and other things older drivers take for granted.

Driver’s Edge offers events around the country, but mostly in the Las Vegas and Reno areas, the Bay Area, CA, Detroit, Atlanta, and Washington, DC, were on their 2014-2015 schedule. Registration was easy, but tends to fill up quickly since it’s a free event (donations are always accepted since it’s a nonprofit organization). Parents are invited and encouraged to attend to watch their child drive and listen to the experts give advice during the activities. Because Driver’s Edge is only a 4-hour program and doesn’t replace a good driving school, DE recommends these schools specifically if they’re available in your area. If not, do some research and find the best school for your new driver; it could save their life and the lives of those around them.

  • Bob Bondurant School of High Performance Driving (Chandler, AZ)
  • Mid-Ohio School (Lexington, OH)
  • Simraceway Performance Driving Center (Sonoma, CA)
  • Skip Barber Racing School (various locations)

Pre- and post-tests are given to assess both parents’ and kids’ knowledge and driving comfort levels and they say we’ll receive follow-up questionnaires after one and two years to see if the skills learned have needed to be used. God I hope not.

I know my son is better equipped as a driver now that he knows he can control the car in a panic situation. It doesn’t rain much here in Las Vegas, so I can hardly wait for the next time that it does so we can go out to an empty parking lot to practice our panic stops (unlike that first time in the parking lot where I practiced looking cool as I tried not to yell as he nearly ran over the curb). My son was hesitant to attend the class—probably due to teenage inertia more than anything—but he was so glad that he did afterwards. And I know he was glad to learn from bonafide experts rather than these “experts”: (language warning 😉 )

Britax B-Ready Stroller Arm Bar Recall

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusmail

Britax USA/Canada B-Ready Arm bar Recall

Britax Child Safety, Inc., in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and Health Canada, is conducting a voluntary recall of select B-Ready stroller and replacement top seat models. This recall involves the foam-padded arm bar on select BReady strollers and replacement top seats manufactured between April 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012. The model numbers included in this recall are identified in the table below.

 

B-Ready Recall

NOTE: No other products are included in this recall. If your Britax product has a different model number than the model numbers listed above or it was made after December 31, 2012 it is NOT included in this recall.

Description of the Defect: Britax has received reports of children biting and ingesting pieces of the non-toxic foam on the arm bar on select B-Ready strollers and replacement top seats manufactured between April 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012. This may pose a choking hazard.

Remedy of the Defect:  Upon request, Britax will send one free black, zippered fabric arm bar cover and a warning label to consumers to apply to their strollers or replacement top seats.

What You Should Do: Determine whether your B-Ready stroller or replacement top seat is included in the recall by inspecting the arm bar on your product. Your product is part of this recall if the foam-padded arm bar on your B-Ready stroller or replacement top seat is exposed and does not have a black, zippered fabric cover. (See images below)

B-Ready Recall 2

If you own recalled product, please follow the steps below:

  1. Visit www.B-ReadyRecall.com to request a kit containing a zippered fabric arm bar cover and warning label.
  2. Remove and discontinue use of the foam-padded arm bar until you receive and apply the zippered fabric cover and warning label. Using the stroller or replacement top seat without the arm bar is safe and permitted. The arm bar is used for child passengers to rest their hands and is not critical for safe use of the stroller or replacement top seat.
  3. Once you receive the kit, please follow the detailed instructions on how to apply the zippered fabric cover and warning label.

If you have questions or concerns, you should contact the Britax Customer Service Department at the dedicated recall line: 1-800-6832045. Customer Service business hours are Monday-Thursday 8:30 am – 5:45 pm (ET) and Friday 8:30 am – 4:45 pm (ET). If you live outside of the US or Canada, you should e-mail Britax.Recall@britax.com.
Britax is committed to the safety of your child and we apologize for any inconvenience this matter may have caused.

2016 ComfortSport/Ready Ride/Classic Ride Recall

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
2016 Graco ComfortSport, Ready Ride, Classic Ride Recall

Graco is recalling some of their ComfortSport, Ready Ride, and Classic Ride convertible carseats due to missing information on a label. This DOES NOT affect the safety of the carseats, but the information is required by NHTSA.

ComfortSportReady Ride JeenaClassic Ride

Seats Affected: ComfortSport, Ready Ride, and Classic Ride convertibles manufactured between March 2014 and February 2015

2016 Graco ComfortSport, Classic Ride Recall

Defect: Missing verbiage on label

2016 Graco convertible recall

Remedy: Graco will send new labels to caregivers. Go to the 2016 Label Recall page to see if your carseat has been recalled. Some carseats within the recall timeframe have corrected labels. You can also call Graco at 1-800-345-4109 (Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST).