News Archive

Should You Toss Your Toxic Car Seat?

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coccoroEvery few years, HealthyStuff.org evaluates car seats based on the presence of flame retardants and certain heavy metals. They just came out with a new report, and you might be concerned about the findings. Let’s talk about what this all means.

First, let me say that I’m concerned about flame retardants, too. Some people brush it off as hippie-helicopter-parents-flipping-out-over-something-harmless. But some of the chemicals found in car seats have known detrimental effects, some have suspected detrimental effects, and at least one is slated to be phased out of use under the Stockholm Convention (a global treaty signed by over 150 countries who have vowed to reduce persistent organic pollutants).

I’ve written other posts about flame retardants for CarseatBlog, and I’m concerned about my own children’s exposure, so I’m not here to tell you the study doesn’t matter or should be ignored. But I’m not going to tell you to panic and throw away your seats, either.

This current study from HealthyStuff appears to be more thorough in some ways than past ones. This study looked for the presence of brominated, chlorinated, and phosphate-based flame retardants. They show which retardants were present in which seats, and they show the potential hazards of each of those compounds.

They do a much better job than in the past of explaining how these chemicals can enter a child’s body: through dermal (skin) contact, inhalation, or ingestion. The organization also provides a better explanation of their methodology and how they weighted the results to come up with their rankings.

Here are some things to keep in mind when looking at the rankings.

  • All car seats must meet federal flammability standards. The flammability standard is harsh, and there’s no way to meet the standard without the use of some kind of chemical flame retardant.
  • We don’t know the risks of all chemicals. We know that some are worse than others, but because fire retardants are largely unregulated, it often takes years before they’re fully tested and their impacts fully understood. A chemical that seems great now might turn out to be hazardous later. That means that we don’t necessarily know how “good” a seat with a “good” ranking really is. We also don’t know if a seat with a “bad” rating is really any worse. Especially because:
  • There’s no way to know how “safe” or how “dangerous” a car seat is. Even the FAQs on HealthyStuff.org’s report states:

    HealthyStuff.org ratings do not provide a measure of health risk or chemical exposure associated with any individual product, or any individual element or related chemical. HealthyStuff.org ratings provide only a relative measure of high, medium, and low levels of concern for several hazardous chemicals or chemical elements in an individual product in comparison to criteria established by our research team and informed by published research studies.

    We don’t know how—or even if—these car seats’ chemicals are having an actual impact on kids.

  • Not all seats were tested. HealthyStuff.org only tested 15 seats. There are a lot of seats that weren’t tested at all. Of the ones that were, we only have data for those particular samples. It’s possible that a company could switch vendors for certain components, meaning that foam that tested poorly (or well) might not even be used in other, seemingly identical seats manufactured at a different time. Basically: there’s just a lot we don’t know.
  • Car seats save lives. It’s okay to be concerned about chemicals in your children’s car seats, but it doesn’t mean the car seat itself is a bad thing. Just the opposite: It’s absolutely necessary and crucial. The chemicals in flame retardants pose a potential risk. Car crashes are a known, real, happening-everyday risk, and are a leading cause of death in children. Properly using an appropriate car seat is one of the best defenses against injury and death. Hands down.

With all that said, what can you do if you’re still concerned about potentially dangerous chemicals in your seats?

  • Don’t leave children in seats longer than necessary. For many reasons, car seats should be for the car, not for lounging or sleeping outside the car for long periods of time. Children left in car seats outside the car are at greater risk for other hazards, too, such as airway obstruction, falls, and strangulation.
  • Clean the cover. The cover isn’t the only part of the seat that contains fire retardants, but it’s the part in most direct contact with your child. Wash it (according to manufacturer instructions) to remove any excess chemicals. Remember that aftermarket covers and products are not recommended because they can interfere with the straps and with the ability to properly tighten the harness.
  • Avoid excess heat. This is sometimes easier said than done, especially during hot summer months, but heat can cause a greater dissipation of flame retardant chemicals. Park your car in the shade, crack windows, use sun shades, and air out the car before you get in it.
  • Vacuum regularly. Flame retardants can gather in dust, so vacuum out your car and your child’s car seat regularly.
  • Contact car seat manufacturers to express your concerns. Public pressure leads to results. Some companies have already abandoned the more-concerning chlorinated and brominated fire retardants in favor of the (seemingly and hopefully) less-concerning halogen-free phosphates. If some companies have done it, all of them can.

If, after all this, you’re still panicking over your particular seat, then by all means get a new one. I don’t think it’s necessary, though.

Remember, I don’t take this topic lightly at all, but guess what seat my youngest child is currently riding in? I won’t name names, but it’s among the seats listed as a “highest concern.” I’m not switching him out of it, though. For one, I have no way of knowing whether his particular seat has the same components as the one tested (nor do I know how any new seat I’d get him would compare to the samples they used). I do clean the seat regularly, and we try to keep windows cracked in the summer as long as there’s no threat of rain. I do my best to mitigate his exposure by avoiding flame retardants in other areas, especially in our mattresses and bedding, where my child currently spends about half his life.

I will definitely contact the manufacturer to encourage them to remove brominated fire retardants from all their products, but in the meantime I’m not going to sacrifice the seat in question, which fits well in my car, fits my child well, and is easy to use correctly each and every time.

New Jersey Updates Child Restraint Laws – Increases Minimum Age For Forward-Facing

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On May 7, 2015, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie signed a bill into law that amended NJ’s child restraint law. This new law takes effect on September 1, 2015.

We know that legal jargon is very confusing so here is the updated New Jersey carseat and booster seat law in plain English:

Children under the age of 8 (through age 7) are legally required to ride in the back seat* as follows:

  • Under age 2 (0-23 months) and weighing less than 30 pounds are required to use a rear-facing carseat with a 5-point harness. This means a convertible used in the rear-facing position or an infant seat. (Note: Most babies will outgrow an infant carrier before their 2nd birthday and will need to transition to a convertible seat used in the rear-facing position. Unless you start off with a convertible seat from birth and then there is no need to transition to a bigger rear-facing seat.)

Graco SnugRide 40  Evenflo Triumph ProComfort - RF Toddler

  •  Age 2 through age 3 (24-47 months) secured in a carseat with 5-point harness either rear-facing (until reaching the weight or height limit) or forward-facing. Having a 3-year-old in just a booster seat is not legal unless they weigh more than 40 lbs.

Diono-Rainier-Clara  Nautilus2

  • Age 4 through age 7 (48 months until 8th birthday) and less than 57 inches tall (4’9″) secured in a forward-facing carseat with 5-point harness or a booster seat. There is no weight requirement in this updated law – only age and height requirements. (Note: If you have an older child who weighs more than 80 lbs. and you’re having a hard time finding a booster seat that they actually still fit in – consider a Safety 1st Incognito Kid Positioner. It’s specifically designed for bigger, older kids.)

Evenflo SK Platinum - harness Jon Turtle Booster Evenflo Amp

  • Age 8 through 17 shall wear a properly adjusted and fastened seat belt

Passing the 5 Step Test

Exemptions:

* If there are no rear seats (e.g., standard cab pickup truck), the child shall be secured in a carseat or booster in the front passenger seat except that no child shall be secured in a rear-facing carseat in the front seat of any motor vehicle which is equipped with a passenger-side airbag that is not disabled or turned off.

Full text of the new law can be found here: http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2014/Bills/A3500/3161_R1.PDF

NEWS: ABC Kids Spring Show 2015

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The Spring ABC Show is quite a bit different than the Fall Show as it’s geared specifically toward specialty retailers. This show has 4 rows of booths in a hotel convention center—this time it was at the Rio in Las Vegas—as opposed to 4 million at the Las Vegas Convention Center at the Fall Show. Hyperbole aside, it’s a much more chill environment and I could chat with manufacturer reps for as long as I wanted. I know you’re all about the latest and greatest, so here’s what I found out.

Cybex

They had the Cloud Q on display. Due to testing, there have to be some tweaks made. Of course! The lovely testing. I heard that a lot as I talked with everyone. So, when used baseless, the Cloud Q’s handle will have to be in the most forward position toward the child’s feet and there are now notches in the handle for the lap portion of the seat belt not only to remind parents it needs to be that way but also to act as a reinforcement to the notches in the seat. They didn’t have a prototype on hand with the new handle to show, so here’s a glossy press version of the Euro model in its full recline mode.

Expected: 2nd half of July

gb_news_cloudq_high

Lil Fan Boosters

Lil Fan makes sports-themed boosters. Have a favorite team? It’s a good chance they’ll have a booster for you! I measured the shoulder belt guides at 21” while Kecia measured them at 19” at the Fall Show, so we’ll be sure to Duke it out and let you know Sooner rather than later.

Highback booster (Club Seat) features:

  • 30-110 lbs., 4-12 years
  • EPS foam
  • 5 position headrest
  • backrest can be removed to make it a backless booster
  • removable dual-sided cup holder

Backless booster (Box Seat) features:

  • 40-110 lbs., 4-12 years
  • adjustable shoulder belt clip

Lil Fan also has a line of team diaper bags available in 3 different styles: messenger bag, backpack, and sling bag, plus there’s an insulated bottle holder. Everything’s available on Amazon.com plus at other retailers so they should be easy to find.

Expected: boosters are due in 30 days.

Lil Fan Notre Dame Lil Fan Ohio State Lil Fan Denver Lil Fan belt guide

Jané (Hahn-ay)

Evenflo Extends Expiration Date on Transitions & Evolve Combination Seats to 8 Years

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Evenflo Transitions - MercuryWe wanted to share this recent news update from Evenflo with our readers. Evenflo has extended the lifespan on their ADVANCED Transitions & Evolve Platinum Combination Seats to 8 years from the DOM (Date of Manufacture).

See our full review of the Evenflo Transitions 3-in-1 here.

This change is retroactive so if you currently own a Transitions or Evolve seat and the DOM label states that it expires in the year 2021 – please make a note in your instruction manual that you can actually use your seat until 2023-xx-xx.

Evenflo Transitions - DOM sticker labeled

Evenflo has recently updated the expiration date for both Evenflo Transitions and Evenflo Evolve 3-in-1 combination seats. Initial production included labels with a 6-year expiration from date of manufacture, but due to the extended use of this seat, new labels will include an 8-year expiration from date of manufacture. Accordingly, your child’s Transitions or Evolve may be safely used for 8 years from the date of manufacture.

If you have any other questions, please contact ParentLink at 1-800-233-5921 (U.S.) or 1-937-773-3971 (Canada), MondayFriday, 8 am – 5 pm (EST). You can also contact us online at:  http://evenflo.com/Support/Contact_Us/.

Stay tuned for a full review of the Evenflo Transitions coming soon!