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Kids Archive

Carseat recommendations

Take pity on me because Marvin is a tough act to follow ;)  Seriously,  that’s one  smart little fella and that link he posted was just priceless. 

Anyhow, the previous blog post “Who’s better?  Who’s best?” got me thinking about the practice of recommending carseats.  The current standardized Child Passenger Safety training curriculum, as well as the previous curriculum, strongly discourages CPS Technicians from recommending specific seats.  The curriculum tells us that it’s okay to recommend specific features (like a 5-pt harnesses, front harness adjuster, etc.) but that we should not recommend specific brands and seats.  So why is it so common to see CPS technicians and even instructors (both online and IRL) recommending specific seats to parents and caregivers?  Let’s examine the issue a little closer…

The Car Seat Afterlife

It\'s a garbage can.So, what do you do with a car seat or booster you no longer need?  That’s a big question that lots of folks ask themselves every day and usually the answer is to stick the seat next to the trash can on the curb.  The problem with that fix is that there are other folks who like to look for a bargain, either out of necessity or just to say they found something great (and who hasn’t driven by someone else’s garbage and seen something in mint condition and thought, “Oh, look at that!  If I just had a truck, I would take that home!”).  Car seats are thrown away for a variety of reasons: they’ve been in a crash and shouldn’t be used again, they’ve expired, or perhaps mom found the cutest cover ever and just wanted to get that sickly brown car seat out of her garage ;).

Acronyms Strike Again

Again we welcome Heather’s dh, Matt, for Guest Wednesday.

As a non-tech person, I am generally confused by the various terminology used on a regular basis by those who are tech people.  But I am trying to learn.  One of these terms is LATCH, which must be really important because it’s in all caps.  I understand the importance of words in all caps. Like me sitting on the couch on the weekend and watching the NFL or the NBA or why don’t the kids go play in the STREET but watch out for CARS and while you’re at it go get the MAIL.

Recalls – the good, the bad and the ridiculous

Recall – the mere words strike fear into the hearts and minds of safety-conscious parents everywhere.  After all, no one wants to hear that there is a potential problem with their carseat – a product that they’ve entrusted to protect their child’s life.  But for child restraint manufacturers, recalls are more than just product issues.  Recalls are usually costly and chock full of bad publicity.  In short, recalls are bad for business.

But recalls are also a part of the business and almost every manufacturer has to face a recall issue sooner or later.  Truthfully, not all recalls are for serious, life-threatening problems although some clearly are.

KIM or Bust!

Welcome to the “new” CarseatBlog.Com!  We hope to be making far more frequent updates than we have over the last year or two.  In particular, we hope to focus on new products, product reviews, conferences and recent media.  To start it off, Heather (murphydog77) and I are off to one of the annual conferences about child passenger safety.

My family’s excellent adventure to KIM, the Kidz In Motion National Child Passenger Safety Conference, got off to an easier-than-expected start yesterday.  We have never taken our entire crew of three kids on an airplane trip before; all of our previous vacations were in the family truckster.  We almost drove this one, too, but vacation time was limited and blowing 4 days on driving wouldn’t have left much for sight seeing.  There were also visions of this.  So, we opted to fly Southwest there as rates had actually dropped since I priced them early this year.  With my 3-year old’s fascination with trains, we decided to splurge and book a family cabin in the Amtrak California Zephyr on the way back.

Of course, I was trying to figure out what to do for child seats…