Kids Archive

Guest Blog: The ABCs of ABC Kids. ++Giveaways!

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The sea of exhibits and exhibitors in the Las Vegas Convention Center this past few days for the 2010 ABC Kids show might have been overwhelming at first, but I found my inner child and began at the beginning…of the alphabet. This is the A-to-Z of ABC.

Guest review: Maxi Cosi Rodi XR

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My impressions:
The Maxi Cosi Rodi XR is very sturdy seat with nice deep headwings. The cup holder is excellent, one of the best designs I’ve seen, it’s easy to install and remove and the design makes it very stable – thus far we’ve had NO spilled drinks, and most cups & water bottles fit. The seat is easy to assemble, and has a built-in recline to help the seat fit better on various different vehicle seats. The height adjustment is a bit tricky, but not difficult.
The illustrations in the manual are excellent, and the explanations of vehicle seats and seat belts are really well done. The manual can be found here: http://www.maxicosi/.us/media/producthandleidingen/maxicosi/4358-4583.pdf
The seatbelt fit on my 55 lb, 6 .5 year old was pretty good, with the lap belt low on her hips. I tried her 48-lb best friend in it, and it fit him well too. They both said it is a comfortable seat, and Joy has no slumping issues when sleeping in it, although a smaller child might.
My major disappointment with the seat: belt guides are VERY narrow, and in my Suburban the belt tends to get pulled out and not retract, leaving a great deal of slack in the belt. If the seatbelt telemetry isn’t just so, a child who is inclined to move around could easily end up with the shoulder belt two feet from their chest. Because of this, I would only be comfortable recommending this seat to someone VERY CPS-conscious.
Additionally, the seat requires the vehicle seat back or head rest to be above the midpoint of the child’s head. For many families, this means the seat is incompatible with their vehicles. The seat does feel more sturdy than many boosters without this requirement, and it doesn’t fall apart when moved or tip when going around tight turns.
Overall, I really want to love this seat, but because of the small belt guides and the head support requirement, I can’t. I give it 3 out of 5 stars.  A few comparison photos of Joy in the Rodi, the Recaro Vivo and the Britax parkway (old style) can be found HERE.

Skaterbabscpst is a long time moderator at our Car-Seat.Org forums and has her own CPS website.  You can find our original review of the Rodi XR here.  You can also find the basic Maxi Cosi Rodi for sale.  It lacks a few features of the XR, but can be found for under $100.

Child ID Labels for Car Seats

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WHALE logoIn the July 2008 edition of SafetyBeltSafe News, there was an article about a woman in Oklahoma who wants all car seats to have occupant identification labels on them.  I think this is a great idea!  I’ve had make your own labels on my web site since before it became CarSeatSite.com–it just seems obvious to me that you’d want something on the seat identifying your child if you are incapacitated.

Christmas came early this year, thanks to Transport Canada

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Combi Center DX infant seat, which detached from the base during testing resulting in a voluntary recall in Canada.

Combi Center DX, since recalled in Canada, pre-test

I’ve spent the last two weeks digging out from under all the virtual wrapping paper, under a very special early virtual Christmas tree. Our government friends here in the great white north sent us a gift that may well give your Lady Liberty a run for her money. I haven’t seen my colleagues so excited since the last release of new Britax fashions. Transport Canada is no Scrooge, that’s for sure–with a free-for-bandwidth virtual haberdashery of crash test footage now available on the government agency’s website. This isn’t the usual made in China knock-off crap, either. You won’t see mom and dad’s old Mercury Monarch rear seat bench magically propelled into a thick wall of nothingness. Nope. Unlike your Coach purse, this is the real thing. Real carseats, real vehicles. The babies are still fake, but they had to draw the line somewhere.

If you haven’t already taken a look, click away:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/roadsafety/safedrivers-childsafety-programs-regulations-research-research-887.htm

Some of that crash test footage was pretty darn shocking, and I’m thinking you’re here because you don’t want your anthropomorphic test dummy’s head slamming into your vehicle’s front seats with such force that said dummy’s going to have more than just a splitting headache as a result. Either that or you’re a concerned parent, Child Passenger Safety Technician, or Children’s Restraint Technician. Perhaps you’re a member of the media reporting on the evils of child restraints and how they fail during testing–but you don’t quite know enough about carseats to really understand what all these failures mean in the real world. The real world..the real babies. The ATDs, however, come at a cost of into six figures. That’s a whole lot of in-vitro, if you went that route. ATD or the more organic version, a real live baby, we want to protect our investments…err..kids’ lives.