Quantcast

Kids Archive

Child ID Labels for Car Seats

WHALE logoIn the July 2008 edition of SafetyBeltSafe News, there was an article about a woman in Oklahoma who wants all car seats to have occupant identification labels on them.  I think this is a great idea!  I’ve had make your own labels on my web site since before it became CarSeatSite.com–it just seems obvious to me that you’d want something on the seat identifying your child if you are incapacitated.

Christmas came early this year, thanks to Transport Canada

Combi Center DX infant seat, which detached from the base during testing resulting in a voluntary recall in Canada.

Combi Center DX, since recalled in Canada, pre-test

I’ve spent the last two weeks digging out from under all the virtual wrapping paper, under a very special early virtual Christmas tree. Our government friends here in the great white north sent us a gift that may well give your Lady Liberty a run for her money. I haven’t seen my colleagues so excited since the last release of new Britax fashions. Transport Canada is no Scrooge, that’s for sure–with a free-for-bandwidth virtual haberdashery of crash test footage now available on the government agency’s website. This isn’t the usual made in China knock-off crap, either. You won’t see mom and dad’s old Mercury Monarch rear seat bench magically propelled into a thick wall of nothingness. Nope. Unlike your Coach purse, this is the real thing. Real carseats, real vehicles. The babies are still fake, but they had to draw the line somewhere.

If you haven’t already taken a look, click away:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/roadsafety/safedrivers-childsafety-programs-regulations-research-research-887.htm

Some of that crash test footage was pretty darn shocking, and I’m thinking you’re here because you don’t want your anthropomorphic test dummy’s head slamming into your vehicle’s front seats with such force that said dummy’s going to have more than just a splitting headache as a result. Either that or you’re a concerned parent, Child Passenger Safety Technician, or Children’s Restraint Technician. Perhaps you’re a member of the media reporting on the evils of child restraints and how they fail during testing–but you don’t quite know enough about carseats to really understand what all these failures mean in the real world. The real world..the real babies. The ATDs, however, come at a cost of into six figures. That’s a whole lot of in-vitro, if you went that route. ATD or the more organic version, a real live baby, we want to protect our investments…err..kids’ lives.

Maybe the Graco My Ride 65 Could Be *My* Ride? A Review.

The latest trend in child restraints is higher rear-facing weight limits.  We’ve been seeing 35 lbs. rear-facing weight limits, but now we have a standout.  Graco has introduced a new seat called the My Ride 65 that breaks the 35 lbs. barrier and accommodates a rear-facing child to 40 lbs.!  This is a convertible (rear-facing and forward-facing) child restraint for kids 5-65 lbs. who are less than 49″ tall.  Rear-facing the seat is rated from 5-40 lbs.  Forward-facing, it can be used for children over 1 year old who weigh between 20-65 lbs.

The My Ride 65 comes with an infant body support cushion, a head support pillow, and harness strap covers.

Combi Dakota Review

Friends of mine in the CPS world have sung the praises of the Combi Dakota backless booster for years now. I recommended it right along with them, usually for older, larger children, but never truly understood the magic of this seat. What could be so great about plastic and cloth that I should NEED to add it to my already-vast booster collection?

But finally I broke down and got one and my 9 year old sat right down in it and proclaimed it her all-time favorite booster.  I asked what she liked so much, and she declared, “It’s cushy for my tushy. And it’s so tall! And the cup holder is big and easy to use. And it’s really easy to buckle”

Of course I read the manual before we went out to the car to test the seat. It has broad weight and height limits: 3 years/33 pounds/33 inches, up to 100 pounds/57 inches. And the instructions are standard for a backless booster, such as requiring a head restraint and shoulderbelt. One interesting warning I found was: “NEVER allow child to buckle themselves in this Booster Car Seat”. I do applaud Combi for encouraging adult involvement in the buckling process, but I think for my own child I’ll just be sure to make a visual check that she’s secured properly.