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Babies Archive

Maybe the Graco My Ride 65 Could Be *My* Ride? A Review.

The latest trend in child restraints is higher rear-facing weight limits.  We’ve been seeing 35 lbs. rear-facing weight limits, but now we have a standout.  Graco has introduced a new seat called the My Ride 65 that breaks the 35 lbs. barrier and accommodates a rear-facing child to 40 lbs.!  This is a convertible (rear-facing and forward-facing) child restraint for kids 5-65 lbs. who are less than 49″ tall.  Rear-facing the seat is rated from 5-40 lbs.  Forward-facing, it can be used for children over 1 year old who weigh between 20-65 lbs.

The My Ride 65 comes with an infant body support cushion, a head support pillow, and harness strap covers.

What Does A Good CPS Tech Do?

I frequently read posts on various parent forums from moms and dads who have taken their vehicles and car seats to child passenger safety technicians to be inspected or installed.  They seem to either have glowing reviews of the tech with whom they worked or they were fuming about something the tech did or didn’t do.  So let’s go through the steps a good tech will take with a parent to ensure the car seat is installed and used properly.

Carseat recommendations

Take pity on me because Marvin is a tough act to follow ;)  Seriously,  that’s one  smart little fella and that link he posted was just priceless. 

Anyhow, the previous blog post “Who’s better?  Who’s best?” got me thinking about the practice of recommending carseats.  The current standardized Child Passenger Safety training curriculum, as well as the previous curriculum, strongly discourages CPS Technicians from recommending specific seats.  The curriculum tells us that it’s okay to recommend specific features (like a 5-pt harnesses, front harness adjuster, etc.) but that we should not recommend specific brands and seats.  So why is it so common to see CPS technicians and even instructors (both online and IRL) recommending specific seats to parents and caregivers?  Let’s examine the issue a little closer…

The Car Seat Afterlife

It\'s a garbage can.So, what do you do with a car seat or booster you no longer need?  That’s a big question that lots of folks ask themselves every day and usually the answer is to stick the seat next to the trash can on the curb.  The problem with that fix is that there are other folks who like to look for a bargain, either out of necessity or just to say they found something great (and who hasn’t driven by someone else’s garbage and seen something in mint condition and thought, “Oh, look at that!  If I just had a truck, I would take that home!”).  Car seats are thrown away for a variety of reasons: they’ve been in a crash and shouldn’t be used again, they’ve expired, or perhaps mom found the cutest cover ever and just wanted to get that sickly brown car seat out of her garage ;).

Recalls – the good, the bad and the ridiculous

Recall – the mere words strike fear into the hearts and minds of safety-conscious parents everywhere.  After all, no one wants to hear that there is a potential problem with their carseat – a product that they’ve entrusted to protect their child’s life.  But for child restraint manufacturers, recalls are more than just product issues.  Recalls are usually costly and chock full of bad publicity.  In short, recalls are bad for business.

But recalls are also a part of the business and almost every manufacturer has to face a recall issue sooner or later.  Truthfully, not all recalls are for serious, life-threatening problems although some clearly are.