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snowconeSome of you are fortunate to live in climates where it doesn’t get cold and snowy. Others of you are huddled under a Snuggie right now, with a blanket of snow outside your window. If you’re in that latter group, is your car’s emergency kit prepared for winter weather?

There are certain emergency provisions you should always have in your vehicle, like a flashlight and a tool kit. But winter comes with some unique situations you should be prepared for. Pack these into your car if you don’t already have them:

  • Blankets. If you run out of fuel or your car won’t stspace blanketsart, it could be/get really cold in there. Fleece throws are warm and take up relatively room. If those are too bulky, you could get some space blankets. They’re not as cozy, but they’re inexpensive and they’ll get the job done.
  • Warm clothes. We don’t want kids wearing bulky winter coats in the car, but you always want to make sure you have coats, hats, and gloves available for everyone when it’s cold. That might seem like a no-brainer, but there have been several times I’ve run a quick errand and haven’t bothered taking my coat since I’m “just running in.” Then I wonder what would happen if I got stranded and had to walk home. I’d be really cold.
  • Sand or kitty litter. If you get stuck in snow or ice, laying down a layer of grit can give you the traction you need to get out. Stick a small container of kitty litter in your car, and you’ll be prepared.
  • A shovel. This one is pretty self-explanatory. If you don’t have room for a full-sized shovel, there are compact, foldable models available.
  • Extra wiper fluid. Have you ever been traveling down I-90 into Chicago in the dead of winter, only to find your windshield covered in gray grime to the point you could barely see and needed to pull off the road, all because you ran out of windshield washer fluid? Uh, me neither? (In our defense, we had just moved from Southern California and didn’t really understand these things yet. Also worth noting: there are different fluids for warm and cold weather. The type for warm weather might freeze in your lines, rendering it useless.)
  • Portable Battery/Charger/Compressor. This is actually a gemergency car chargerreat thing to have year-round, but especially in the winter. It’s an appliance about the size of a tool box that can jump your car, refill your tires, illuminate the dark, and charge or power your cell phones or other electronics. It’s like having an emergency roadside vehicle in your trunk, minus the towing capability.

Stay safe out there, and stay warm!